Artisan Restaurant Southport, Connecticut

by Liza Laserow

Before: Entrance, outdoor and bar

Before: Tavern

Before: Bar looking into what is going to be the fine dining

After: Entrance

After: Outdoor dining

After: Outdoor Bar

After: Bar

After: Lounge in tavern

After: Fine dining

After: Built in bookcase

Review in the New York Times!

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/29/nyregion/artisan-in-southport-offers-creative-decor-and-more.html

Photo by Fabian Berglund (fabcreative.wordpress.com)

A little less than a year ago I finished designing my first commercial interior project; Artisan Restaurant in Southport, Connecticut. It all started with a discussion about Swedish fabrics and ended up in a successful project with amazing reviews in the New York Times. The idea behind the concept was to create an interior with a strong Scandinavian feel mixed with influences from the local New England style. I divide my projects into comfort zones where each zone plays its role. This was a great space to work with and we made in into three major parts and those parts into another three. The major parts were garden, tavern and fine dining room. The garden got a bar, a lounge and a dining part under the pergola. The tavern got a lounge, large bar and a dining room. In the fine dining area we built a private dining room and created a “special table” in the far corner of the room with a built-in book-case. That has now become the favorite spot for guests to be seated.

When designing a restaurant antiques are not always the most practical type of furniture to use but when it comes to accessorizing its the way to go. I placed a variety of swedish antique accessories with a rustic feeling along with vintage books to tone down and the new bookcase. They are the past that balance the present. As a focus piece in the lounge part of tavern we placed a Swedish “kakel-ugn”. A fire-place covered in white glazed tile. The “kakel ugn” came to Sweden in 1767 when the Swedish government wanted to create a more efficient heating system for the households and then became the most important source of heating during the 19th and 20th century.

Chef Frederic Kieffer makes wonder with the food and focus on the local producers to deliver the groceries. The menu has gotten well deserved rave reviews so if you haven been you should definitely pay a visit!

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